Tuesday, November 13, 2007

Graphics Club From Primsy Doodle Designs

I think you all know how much I like graphics, especially FREE graphics. So, I thought I'd tell you about a FREE Graphics Club offered by Lisa of Primsy Doodle Designs that I recently joined.

Lisa's FREE Graphics Club offers country & primitive graphics such as Annie's, gingerbread men, jars, 125x125 buttons, 468X60 standard button with an area to add a name, backgrounds, Americana, avatars, mini-plugs with an area to add a name, etc.

She also has a program to re-size images and "Members Only" specials on some of her graphics that are for sale on her Primsy Doodle Designs website.

Shown below are a few of the many FREE graphics she offers in her FREE Graphics Club:



Annie Graphics
Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved - Primsy Doodle Designs




Annie Avatar
Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved - Primsy Doodle Designs



Background Graphics
Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved - Primsy Doodle Designs



Gingerbread Cookie Jar Graphics
Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved - Primsy Doodle Designs



468x60 Standard Banners
Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved - Primsy Doodle Designs



125x125 Button Graphics
Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved - Primsy Doodle Designs



88x31 Mini-Plug Graphics
Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved - Primsy Doodle Designs



Here's Lisa's reason for the club and how you join: "I have created this free club for my faithful customers and friends who help to promote Primsy Doodle Designs!"

All you need to do to JOIN is save one of the banners at the bottom of this page, place on your website,blog or myspace profile and link to 
http://primsydoodledesigns.net/

Please respect Lisa's TERMS OF USE - YOU MAY USE THE GRAPHICS ON THIS WEBSITE FOR PERSONAL AND COMMERCIAL USES (WEBSETS,TEMPLATES,EMBROIDERY ETC.) AS LONG AS YOU DO NOT MASS PRODUCE,SELL THE GRAPHICS AS IS,CLAIM THEM AS YOUR OWN OR PASS THEM AROUND IN ANY MANNER. YOU MUST GIVE CREDIT TO PRIMSY DOODLE DESIGNS WHERE THE GRAPHICS ARE USED AND YOU MUST HAVE LINKS TO PRIMSY DOODLE DESIGNS ON YOUR WEBSITES, BLOGS ETC. THANK YOU FOR FOLLOWING THE RULES AS THESE IMAGES WERE DRAWN AND CREATED BY ME AND THEY TOOK SOME TIME, BUT I LOVED MAKING THEM IN HOPES THAT YOU WILL LOVE USING THEM. PRIM BLESSINGS, LISA

I hope you decide to join Lisa's FREE Graphics Club, too. Don't forget to checkout her Primsy Doodle Designs website.

Monday, November 12, 2007

Fabric Flawed Blanket Inspires Creativity by Serena Smith of Embroidery Treasures

Here is something that happened a few years ago that helped me to think of different creative solutions when there is a desperate need! :)

Time slipped away and before I knew it, the baby shower is tomorrow. It is 8:00 pm and I still have to embroider a baby blanket for my cousin's new little baby. I am thinking to myself, "No problem, I have a piece of pink flannel that I can embroider the baby's info.

"About an hour later, I have the design finished on the computer and sent to the embroidery machine. I found the pink flannel, rounded the corners, mark the embroidery placement, place the fabric in the hoop and stitch the design.

After the embroidery is complete, I trim the jump threads and tear off the stabilizer on the back. I'm thinking, "I just need to serge a roll hem around the edge on the serger and I will be done."

As I am pressing the embroidery, I notice a white mark in the center of the blanket. To my horror, the mark grows into a line! This line extends through the center of the blanket, yes, a faded line right on the fold of the fabric.

It's staring right up at me and no amount of rubbing is going to lessen that stark white line! "What am I going to do," I am thinking to myself, "I don't have any more pink flannel to stitch another design nor do I have time to start over." It is almost 10:00 pm at this time.

After I panicked for a moment, I started rummaging through my drawer of serger thread. Staring right at me were 3 cones of pink variegated wooly nylon thread! An idea started forming in my head, "What if I would serge a roll hem right over that faded line in addition to the edges?"

I serged right over the faded line, right down the center of the blanket. To create a more completed look, I decided to roll hem down the center of the blanket going the other direction in addition to serging around the edges. After the serging is complete, I laid it out and evaluated my work, "It still needs something to tie it all together."



I dug around in my drawer of buttons and found some delicate little pink roses which I securely hand tacked on in various places. "Yes, that will work. In fact, the variegated thread and roses add a nice touch," I say to myself.



I quickly pressed and wrapped the gift, glad to have it finished. It wasn't yet midnight and I could cross that off my to do list for tomorrow!

I don't know how many times I have had something similar to this happen. I only have a short time frame to finish something, I make or find a mistake and I have to figure out a way to correct or cover it up! Let me tell you, it CAN be done!! If I could count the projects that have an added butterfly, another quilt border, an asymmetrical design instead of symmetrical or an extra detail, the number would be in the high double digits!

Adding embroidery to cover up a hole in the fabric, inserting another fabric color because you ran out of the original or appliqueing a design over a scorch mark the iron left is not covering up a mistake or trying to make it look correct. It is called CREATIVITY!! You can come up with the most creative ideas when you are desperate!

So the next time you make a mistake or find a flaw, don't go into panic mode! Take a deep breath, calm down and ask yourself, "How can I create a new design element in this project?"

By the way, my flawed pink blanket turned out so well that I have made multiple blankets the same way! Here is one that I have stashed away for future use!




Serena Smith is an avid embroidery and quilting enthusiast living in Kansas. Creating new projects and sharing them with others through local classes and online lessons is one of her greatest joys. Visit her website, Embroidery Treasures, for fun projects, helpful tips, inspiration, notions, fabrics and embroidery supplies!

You may freely reprint this article on your website or in your newsletter provided the entire article, author's name, bio information and URL remain intact. Thank you! ©2007 Serena Smith Embroidery Treasures

Copyright ©2007 - All Rights Reserved - Written By Serena Smith. Serena is the owner of Embroidery Treasures http://www.embtreasures.com/

Saturday, November 10, 2007

Quilt Sleeve Triangles by Serena Smith of Embroidery Treasures



A quilt sleeve is a must if you plan to hang your quilt or wall hanging. Last week we discussed how to create and attach a quilt sleeve to the back of your quilt across the entire width of the quilt. This is a must for large wall hangings and full size quilts. But there is another simple method for hanging your wall hangings that measure 45" square or smaller. Try this method of quilt sleeve triangles for your next small project!

Note: The quilt sleeve triangles will need to be stitched on before the binding is stitched to the quilt.

For wall hangings 10" - 25", cut two squares that measure 4". For wall hangings 26" - 45", cut two squares that measure 8".



Fold each square in half to form a triangle. Place the raw edge corner that is created in the top corner of the quilt back. Repeat with the second triangle in the opposite top corner. Baste the corners to the edge of the quilt.



Stitch the binding to the quilt front as usual, sewing through the layers, including the triangle pieces. Tack down the binding as usual, covering the seam allowance and triangle raw edges.

Insert a dowel rod between the two triangles to hang your project. Place the rod over a nail to hang.To prevent the wall hanging from sagging in the center, be sure the dowel rod fits snuggly from end to end. If the rod fits snuggly between the triangles, the project will hang evenly and flat. If the bottom hem of your wall hanging wants to flap around, add the triangles to the two bottom corners and insert a dowel rod to help keep it flat and straight.

Keep in mind that the triangles need to be stitched before the binding is stitched to the quilt. Although it is easier to sew the triangles on before the binding is there, you could also sew the triangles on after the binding has been stitched on, but before it has been tacked down by hand to the back. Just be sure to skip stitching the mitered corner so the miter will turn correctly as the binding is flipped to the back.

For large quilts, the triangles do not give enough support to hold the quilt. A traditional quilt sleeve is the better method. If you do use the triangle method, your triangles will need to be larger and you may need a support in the center to hold the quilt to the rod. If you are entering a quilt or wall hanging for a contest or challenge, most shows will require a traditional quilt sleeve instead of the quicker method of sleeve triangles.

Serena Smith is an avid embroidery and quilting enthusiast living in Kansas. Creating new projects and sharing them with others through local classes and online lessons is one of her greatest joys. Visit her website, Embroidery Treasures, for fun projects, helpful tips, inspiration, notions, fabrics and embroidery supplies!

You may freely reprint this article on your website or in your newsletter provided the entire article, author's name, bio information and URL remain intact. Thank you!
©2007 Serena Smith Embroidery Treasures

Copyright ©2007 - All Rights Reserved - Written By Serena Smith. Serena is the owner of Embroidery Treasures www.embtreasures.com

Thursday, November 08, 2007

Batting: That Stuff in my Quilt by Serena Smith of Embroidery Treasures

The "stuffing" of the quilt - batting - is the filler material placed between the quilt top and the backing. It provides warm the and loft, giving body and structure to the quilt. "Loft" refers to the thickness and weight of a batting. Each type of loft creates a different effect in the finished quilt and needs to be considered before selecting a batt for a quilt.

Cotton - A cotton batting gives a traditional look and is the most suitable for machine quilting. It is very easy to work with, as the cotton tends to "grab" fabric layers and requires minimal pinning and basting. Cotton batts "breathe" well; some people find polyester quilts too warm, preferring lighter weight cotton quilts.

Wool - Another natural fiber batting, wool was widely used in the past and is becoming more and more available as a filler for modern quilts. Quilts filled with wool provide excellent insulation, giving warmth without being heavy, and they retain their loft even after much wear.

Silk - Silk battings share some of the characteristics of other natural fiber battings, but are more difficult to find, expensive and are the least often used by quilters. However, silk batts are excellent for quilted clothing - they are lightweight, drape well and have natural insulation properties.

Polyester - Polyester battings come in a variety of thicknesses, from low loft batts used in machine quilting, to high loft batts ideal for use in comforters, tied quilts and other projects where volume is required. Readily available, polyester batts produce a "puffy" appearance. They tend to be slippery and may require extra pinning and basting to prevent shifting.

What's my favorite batting to use in quilts? I prefer to use a 100% cotton batting or a 80 cotton/ 20 poly blend. The 100% cotton will shrink some and will give your quilt an antique look to it because of the shrinkage. The blend has just enough poly to prevent the shrinkage and antique look, but also has the same feel as the 100% cotton. The cotton & cotton blend both have a lower loft, grab the fabric to hold it and is easier to stitch and quilt!

If I am tying or stitching in a few random places on a quilt or project, I will use a poly batting. The poly has more loft to it, so it is a little tough to get through your sewing machine. Although, for puffy projects, it works great. Keep your scraps of poly batting and use it to stuff pillows, animals or other projects.

Serena Smith is an avid embroidery and quilting enthusiast living in Kansas. Creating new projects and sharing them with others through local classes and online lessons is one of her greatest joys. Visit her website, Embroidery Treasures, for fun projects, helpful tips, inspiration, notions, fabrics and embroidery supplies!

You may freely reprint this article on your website or in your newsletter provided the entire article, author's name, bio information and URL remain intact. Thank you! ©2007 Serena Smith Embroidery Treasures

Copyright ©2007 - All Rights Reserved - Written By Serena Smith. Serena is the owner of Embroidery Treasures http://www.embtreasures.com/

Tuesday, November 06, 2007

Fabric Buying: How many yards should I buy? by Serena Smith of Embroidery Treasures

The past few weeks I have been sorting through my overwhelming collection of fabric. Yes, for most of you this may only take a few hours or a couple days, but for my toppling stash, it can very easily take a couple of weeks! :) As I am sorting different pieces into piles for projects, several thoughts are running through my mind - Why did I ever buy this fabric? Why didn't I buy another yard of that? Oh, I wish I had the coordinate to this floral! I'm tired of this fabric; it has sat on my shelf for over 5 years and I still haven't used it.

Often I will end up with more fabric than I need for a project or not quite enough for what I am wanting to do. What are my guidelines for buying fabric? Everyone has their own ideas, but here are a few of my thoughts...

When I first started sewing and buying fabric, I had a 3 yard rule. It didn't matter what it was, if I liked it, I bought 3 yards. In my mind this gave me enough for several kinds of garments, lots of quilt blocks & borders and plenty for cutting and stitching errors. Several years later, I knew my 3 yard rule had to change. Not only was I running out of space to store all my fabric, but my checkbook just couldn't handle the expense.

I desperately needed to develop a new strategy for buying fabric, so I came up with the following rules:

It's a piece I love & can use in various ways, 3-4 yards.
It's something I like & don't have anything that is similar, 2-3 yards.
I absolutely love it, but don't have any idea what I'll use it for, 1-2 yards.
It's unique & different, but not my favorite, 1/2 - 1 yard.
It's on sale for a fantastic price & can be used in a hundred different ways, whatever is left on the bolt.

Now, with quite a fabric stash built up, I don't always buy following those guidelines. Over the years my taste and thinking in fabric has changed. Some fabrics I have used and am now tired of trying to use in new projects. A few are dated in the sense that some prints and colors are popular for a time and then go out of style. I have also developed more of a feel for which fabrics I will be more likely to use and what projects I can create from them.

I still love fabric and will indulge in several yards here and there, but not to the extent that I did in past years. I try to keep in mind the following:

I'm using it for a project right now, whatever I need plus 1/4-1/2 yard extra.
It's a solid, marbled, textured, or tone on tone print that can easily be used to stitch embroidery designs on, plus many other uses, 3-4 yards.
It's a novelty fabric, floral design, kid's theme or Christmas print and I love it, 1-2 yards.

What's my theory behind these guidelines? If I am only purchasing a yardage amount for a project, I like to have a little extra. That way if I make mistakes such as figuring wrong measurements or cutting wrong sizes, I'm still ok. A solid, marbled, textured or tone on tone fabric is perfect for embellishing with embroidery; for obvious reasons - the designs will show up on these fabrics versus a busy print. Not only are these pieces great for embroidery, but they also work well for blending or coordinating novelty and floral print fabrics. A fabric that is an obvious or busy print is more limited and can't be used quite as many ways as a solid, so I try not to buy as much of it. It can easily be incorporated with several solids or tone on tone fabrics.

This lets me get the fabric I need, while letting me purchase some fabric for future use. It keeps my fabric stash in check, but doesn’t let it dwindle down to nothing! There are still times when I enter a fabric store or go online and buy more than I really need. Or as my mom used to say when I would come home with a sack full of fabric or another box of fabric arrived at our front door, "You just can't stand it; you just had to buy it!" But when starting a new project, I try to use fabric from my collection with maybe only needing to buy a piece or two to blend in with what I already own.

Do I regret having the fabric that keeps my shelves overflowing? No, definitely not! Maybe I went a little overboard, but I have found it very useful to have multiple pieces in several colors of prints and solids. I can pull out pieces and coordinate the colors I want for whatever project I am currently work on. I may only need one or two additional pieces to complete it or perhaps none at all.

The next time you are ready to buy yards of fabric, keep in mind what you are going to use it for. Is it just something you love and will not really use? Or is it a marbled or textured piece of fabric that can be used to stitch embroidery designs, blend with floral or novelty fabrics or used as a quilt backing?

Do keep in mind that your fabric buying habits and ideas will change. There will be times when you are sewing more projects with prints versus solids or batiks. Or perhaps two or three colors will grab your attention for several months. There are most certainly no rights or wrongs in purchasing fabric, just different ideas. Thinking about what you are buying and the reason for it may help your stash to be put into quilts and other projects instead of just sitting on the shelf.

Serena Smith is an avid embroidery and quilting enthusiast living in Kansas. Creating new projects and sharing them with others through local classes and online lessons is one of her greatest joys. Visit her website, Embroidery Treasures, for fun projects, helpful tips, inspiration, notions, fabrics and embroidery supplies!

You may freely reprint this article on your website or in your newsletter provided the entire article, author's name, bio information and URL remain intact. Thank you! ©2007 Serena Smith Embroidery Treasures

Copyright ©2007 - All Rights Reserved - Written By Serena Smith. Serena is the owner of Embroidery Treasures http://www.embtreasures.com/

Monday, November 05, 2007

Unwanted Fabric: How do you get rid of it? by Serena Smith of Embroidery Treasures

I have some and I am sure you do too: fabric you no longer want, need or will use. What do you do with it? Let it sit on the shelf or in the drawer for months while it is aging? Give it away? Perhaps keep it until you reach the day that you might just possibly use it?

I have fabric that I purchased several years ago that I know I will never use. The pattern or print is not what I am interested in right now. Some of it, I simply have lost interest in. The creativity I saw in it when I bought it is no longer there. I have pieces of fabric leftover from past projects and will probably not be using it in the future.

What can you do with it? Good question; I tend to save and store all my fabric until I have a huge pile. Always in the back of my mind, I hear this little voice saying, "Just keep it; you may need it sometime." But as the months fly by, I pick it up to use and end up putting it back on the shelf. It is just not the right color shade to blend with so many of my other fabrics. Or the print is a pattern that is hard to work with like strips or plaids.

I have a blue/navy floral print cotton sitting on my shelves of fabric right now. At the time I bought it, it was one of those, "It's on sale for a fantastic price & can be used in a hundred different ways, whatever is left on the bolt". (See Fabric Buying: How many yards should I buy?) Needless to say I DID buy what was left on the bolt - all 13 yards! I have had it for several years and have tried many times to incorporate it into some of my projects. I have used bits and pieces off of it here and there, but there are still many yards remaining. I had planned to incorporate this print into an embroidered quilt I was planning at the time, but the fabric ended up being just a little too lightweight for stitching embroidery. It may only sit on my shelf for a couple more months before I decide that it has to go.

Do I need to just toss this fabric in the trash? Of course not!! I may not have any interest in it, but it is still a very good piece of fabric and another person may find it to be just what they are needing! So what do you do with your unwanted fabric? Here are some suggestions for cleaning out your shelves!

Look at the wrong side of your fabric. The backside may yield some creative ideas that the front doesn't have. Perhaps it will give you ideas for a washed-out or softened look for a nature background scene.

Consider incorporating small pieces into your current projects. Use small pieces for applique designs, sashing between blocks on a quilt or piping to complete a pillow. The fabric may not be your favorite in a large piece, but using small bits may be a way to use up excess yardage.

Keep a small stash of fabric that is not your favorite for practice blocks, trying new techniques and new ideas where you do not want to waste expensive fabric for a project. If you are trying a new block or technique, try it using a piece from your unwanted fabric before using your project fabric.

Try crocheting your own rag rug using fabric strips. Tear your fabric into strips that are 1/4"- 1" wide and weave it into a circular or oval rug pattern. You can find more information on crocheting rag rugs here.

Braid fabric strips to create a rug, placemats, table runner or many other projects! For young sewers, five them fabric strips to make a dog or cat leash. This is a simple way to use up unwanted fabric and gain some useful projects. The fabric is braided with many different prints and solids, so you can't find your ugly fabric hidden within.

Have a local fabric exchange with several quilters in your area or your local quilt guild. You aren't the only one with excess fabric that needs a new home. You may be able to get rid of some of your stash and find some treasures for yourself.

Donate your fabric to nursing homes, schools or other organizations who will use the fabric to make projects. There are many charity quilt projects that are always looking for donated fabric.

How will I get rid of my over 10 yard stash of navy floral? A couple of months ago, I was playing with chenille, layering different fabrics, trying different widths of stitched rows and I was able to use 1/2 yard with which to practice. I had a travel pillow that just needed a cover that could be removed and washed...yes, the blue floral fabric was used! Sooner or later I will use it piece by piece. And if I find I am running out of room and find someone who will use it, I may just give it away.

See how you can join in on our current Fabric Swap. You are sure to get rid of some of your fabric and perhaps find some new treasures!

Serena Smith is an avid embroidery and quilting enthusiast living in Kansas. Creating new projects and sharing them with others through local classes and online lessons is one of her greatest joys. Visit her website, Embroidery Treasures, for fun projects, helpful tips, inspiration, notions, fabrics and embroidery supplies!

You may freely reprint this article on your website or in your newsletter provided the entire article, author's name, bio information and URL remain intact. Thank you! ©2007 Serena Smith Embroidery Treasures

Copyright ©2007 - All Rights Reserved - Written By Serena Smith. Serena is the owner of Embroidery Treasures http://www.embtreasures.com/

Sunday, November 04, 2007

Pillow Fillers: The Good & Bad by Serena Smith of Embroidery Treasures

Which to use - a pillow form or fiberfill to stuff your newly created pillow? Good question! I tend to use pillow forms over stuffing it with fiberfill. Why? For several reasons - it is much easier to insert a pillow form rather than stuffing, the form gives a more uniform and smooth shape and you can remove the form before washing! Here are some examples of some finished pillows that are stuffed correctly and incorrectly.



This fleece pillow is plump, full and just right with a 26" pillow form. The form needs to fit snuggly, but not so full that it looks like it is just waiting to burst the seams on the pillow cover. Since fleece stretches some, be sure to cut your fabric squares smaller than the pillow form measurement.

On this pillow, all the edges are clipped and tied together (same technique as the popular tied fleece blankets) to hold the pillow form in. Because there are no seams to create a complete closure, this style of pillow would not work if it was to be stuffed with fiberfill.



This 18" pillow has been stuffed with fiberfill and repeatedly been tossed, thrown and laid on. Not only does it need to be stuffed with more fiberfill, but the fiberfill has begun to bunch and create lumps. This pillow needs to be rejuvenated with some more fiberfill to create a more professional look.



Be careful not to over stuff your pillow or use a pillow form that is too large. This frosty friends pillow is just that - too full! If I open the zipper in the back, I may not get it shut again! The pillow form is 12" x 16" and the cover is 1" smaller in each direction. The pillow looks ready to burst and does support the mitered flange as it should.



If you have ever been able to locate a pillow form alphabet, please inform me!! I would love to know! This is one type of pillow which is not possible to use a pillow form. Curves such as the J and smaller areas such as the legs of the N and A require small amounts of fiberfill to fill each area.



However, each area needs to be filled evenly or the fiberfill will shift around and create unfilled areas. Like the middle of this N; it lacks some fiberfill in the center. This makes the N look crooked when sitting up because it lacks the fiberfill in the center to support it.



Can't find the pillow form size you need and you don't want to use fiberfill? Try using multiple layers of a high loft polyester batting. Cut multiple layers of batting until you reach the fullness the pillow needs.



I actually had planned to use a 12" x 16" pillow form, but the pillow cover finished smaller than planned. I didn't want to overfill the cover as I had done in the frosty friends pillow above, so I layered scraps of batting to fill the pillow.

You can see some more information for pillow forms, fiberfill and pillow sizes here.

Serena Smith is an avid embroidery and quilting enthusiast living in Kansas. Creating new projects and sharing them with others through local classes and online lessons is one of her greatest joys. Visit her website, Embroidery Treasures, for fun projects, helpful tips, inspiration, notions, fabrics and embroidery supplies!

You may freely reprint this article on your website or in your newsletter provided the entire article, author's name, bio information and URL remain intact. Thank you! ©2007 Serena Smith Embroidery Treasures

Copyright ©2007 - All Rights Reserved - Written By Serena Smith. Serena is the owner of Embroidery Treasures http://www.embtreasures.com/

Friday, November 02, 2007

What is Stippling? by Serena Smith of Embroidery Treasures



What is stippling? Stippling is a free-motion technique used to fill areas of a quilt. It consists of squiggly lines that curve and twist around without crossing over or creating a sharp point. Stippling can be tiny - 1/2 inch loops or large - 2-3 inch loops. It depends on the look you want to create.

The smaller the stippling, the more it flattens the fabric. Larger stipples give the fabric a puffed up appearance. Backgrounds are great for small stippling because it creates texture. Whereas larger loop are better for a large, open area to fill in a quilt.

Stippling is free motion, with you in total control. The feed dogs are lowered or covered on your machine so you can guide the fabric under the needle. Let your imagination take over and guide the sandwich without lines or motifs to follow.

The goal is to have even, consistent stitches. To accomplish this, keep the stitching speed of your foot petal and the movement of the fabric with your hands in tune with each other. If your stitching speed increases, your hands must move a little faster. If your stitching speed decreases, your hands must move a little slower.

Stippling take practice. Start on a test sandwich and create curvy lines and shapes that resemble a jigsaw puzzle. Change directions and vary the shapes without crossing over another line. Start on an edge and work your way toward the middle. Be careful not to quilt yourself into a corner.

Think of a large quilt as small areas of stippling. Plan where you are going to start and look ahead as you are quilting to the next area. Finish that area and move on to the next until your project is complete.

Serena Smith is an avid embroidery and quilting enthusiast living in Kansas. Creating new projects and sharing them with others through local classes and online lessons is one of her greatest joys. Visit her website, Embroidery Treasures, for fun projects, helpful tips, inspiration, notions, fabrics and embroidery supplies!

You may freely reprint this article on your website or in your newsletter provided the entire article, author's name, bio information and URL remain intact. Thank you! ©2007 Serena Smith Embroidery Treasures

Copyright ©2007 - All Rights Reserved - Written By Serena Smith. Serena is the owner of Embroidery Treasures http://www.embtreasures.com/