Thursday, February 22, 2007

Knitting Tutorials by Ruth of Woolly Wormhead

Ruth aka Woolly Wormhead is an exceptional knitter and she has provided several wonderful FREE knitting tutorials on her Woolly Wormhead website.

Her FREE tutorials include the following:


Spinning With A Drill - The Spinning Drill

Rainbow Dye Wool Yarn - Weekend catch up - Rainbow Dyeing


Variegated Dyeing - Variegated dyeing in the microwave



If you would like to read Ruth's FREE tutorials just click on the picture or name above for the tutorial that you want.

Copyright 2006 All Rights Reserved - Woolly Wormhead
Copyright:-Hate to do this folks, but it's my design and so the rights belong to me. Feel free to use this pattern for your own, private use, but not for commercial reproduction or selling in either written or finished form without prior permission from
me, ok? Cool. Let's be friends.

Knitting E-Patterns From Ruth of Woolly Wormhead

If you love to knit funky hats then you will love Woolly Wormheads (aka Ruth) knit hats. Ruth is extremely creative and has been knitting since she was 3 and offers some of her knit hat creations as free E-Patterns on her Woolly Wormhead website.

Show below are a few of her free knit hat E-Patterns that she has on the free patterns page of her Woolly Wormhead website.  Just click on the picture or hat name for the free E-Pattern and knitting instructions.

Please note Ruth's Copyright Terms of Use below.

Jester Hat - by Woolly Wormhead

Here's what Ruth had to say about this pattern:  I love this hat, for the sheer simplicity of design. It can be knit on any gauge and can have from 1 to 3 ears/points (is there a technical name for the jester 'prongs'?) I have made it with 4, yet it got a bit tight on the needles... still, it can be done. The 2 or 1 point versions can even be knit on straights if you're not keen on working in the round. Convert it to crochet? No problem. The only thing I'd say about working in the round - due to the nature of the rapid increases at the top, I think circulars would be a bit tricky - they get tight enough on DPN's. The only other disadvantage I can think of right now is that psychologically, it can be a bit of a chore working towards the top.... most knitted hats decrease towards the crown and the thought of the end being near is a pleasant one. Here, it's the reverse... but hang in there and I promise you won't be disappointed.

Rollin' Beret - by Woolly Wormhead

Here's what Ruth had to say about this pattern: Tom keeps pointing out to me that I'm not writing any of the patterns down that I develop... Y'know, my hats just seem to grow all by themselves. Anyhow, here's one that has stuck in memory and been scribbled down for all to share. It's even been tested twice. Rock on.






Ribbed Beanie - A quick Hat knitted in the round using a bold rib. Chunky yarn, 5.5mm DPN's an a gauge of 16sts to 10cm/4 inches. Ideal for all knitting abilities.



You can find many more free knitting patterns on Woolly Wormhead's FREE patterns page.

Copyright 2006 All Rights Reserved - Woolly Wormhead
Copyright:-Hate to do this folks, but it's my design and so the rights belong to me. Feel free to use this pattern for your own, private use, but not for commercial reproduction or selling in either written or finished form without prior permission from
me, ok? Cool. Let's be friends.

More FREE Graphics by Denise Bailey

I just love Denise Bailey's FREE graphics. Especially her Annie Dolls. I'm so happy that she is letting us post more of her FREE graphics here for you.

Here's the terms of use per Denise: These graphics are FREE for you to use for your own personal use. They are in .gif format. Please do not offer these images for download anywhere else. Do not sell these images, the copyright belongs to me.

*Free* Annie Doll Graphics



Copyright © 2006 - All Rights Reserved — KKL Graphics - Created By Denise Bailey



Copyright © 2006 - All Rights Reserved — KKL Graphics - Created By Denise Bailey

FREE Raggedy Rocker



Copyright © 2006 - All Rights Reserved — KKL Graphics - Created By Denise Bailey

FREE Gramma Angel



Copyright © 2006 - All Rights Reserved — KKL Graphics - Created By Denise Bailey

*Free* Watermelon Angel & Crows, Winter Bunny Graphics





*Free* Gingerbread Cookie Light Graphic




Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved — Written By Denise Bailey (aka NeeNee) who is a 54 year old mom & grandma who has been crafting for over 34 years for myself and family but only in the last 2 years have been actively crafting for profit via craft shows, eBay and an EZshoppe. My 'specialties' are primitives, country and folkart creations.I also love to create graphics. I was interested in drawing since I was very young, taking art classes all through high school. I always thought I'd go to an art school after graduation, but instead I got married and started a family. Six years ago, I purchased my first computer, and found PSP. I've been hooked since and have taught myself to make my own graphics using PSP's vector & nodes tool. My website is: KKL Primitives .  My Blogs are: The Krazy Kraft Lady and Menopausal Monster .

Making "Fabric Paper" by Arlee Barr

Now I know there are lots of articles in Quilting Arts and ClothPaperScissors and recipes galore for this item, but i can't find any online. If you've been looking, here are some basic instructions then! This is messy but so satisfying, like playing in the mud with your sister's favourite doll.

What you need:

a large sheet of plastic----this is your "work area"

thin fabric like cheesecloth, scrim, thin cotton or polycotton----this is the "base" fabric; start with at least a couple chunks, two feet square is manageable and gives you a good size to work with during and after when you want to create something with it--- i used a crappy polycotton sleeze that was perfect for this and nothing else!

white glue----yes Elmer's type; you will water it down to about the consistency of cream--if it's more watery, don't worry; as long as there is a reasonable proportion of glue to water, things will stick! Mine was quite runny.

You'll need a cheap brush or two to "baste" with and some for your paints too.

Bits and pieces, scraps, shreds of paper--tissue, newspaper, artpaper, whatever----threads, snips of fabric, feather bits---cut the main "spine" out----glitter, mica flakes, anything goes, but NOT anything that will be
lumpy---start a box with all this; there is nothing more frustrating than getting the gluey sheet ready and realizing the stuffs ya want on it are in the back of the closet behind the dryer under the stairs in the basement. Ask me.

Paints of some sort--liquid acrylic like the cheap dollar store bottle type or your shudder good fabric paints--i use a combination of both---these pieces are NOT going to be washed! Alternately you can use dyes.

Pieces of organza, sheers, cheesecloth or thin see through fabric for top layer.

Are you wearing your messyinthemudplayingwithfireanddirt clothes? Go put them on.

Water your glue down. Spread your plastic. Paint the plastic with an even layer of the glue. Lay your base fabric on the gluey plastic and squish it flat so the glue penetrates all of it. You can baste with more glue if needed. Don't worry about wrinkles, just gives more texture! Now start sprinkling or placing bits of thread and snips of fabric, torn and crumpled but flattened pieces of paper, feather shreds, what have you. You want some texture, but not big bumps or lumps. You also don't have to do this step if you don't want, just add larger bits of fabric and paper and go to the next step. You could have worn gloves you know if things sticking to you bothers you......

You want colour other than the ones ya got? Start dripping, smearing, spraying, brushing your paints on----areas can touch, overlap, blend or not. Don't get really really thick; you want some pliabilty when it's done! Sprinkle the glitter now if you want.

Take your top layer and lay over the whole. Squash it down; it's going to bleed through, things will slide a bit so don' t get neurotic about "control"--it's a spontaneous "blending" of the elements. Make it as flat as you can so it will adhere, but don't make it steamroller flat !Leave the whole mess on the plastic and move it somewhere safe to dry. You don't want cat hair, cheerios, the tv remote or your DH's backside on it while it dries.

Now comes the hard part. Wait. Wait some more. Wait some more more. Let it dry at least 24 hours on the plastic sheet. Unless you have an area that's really warm and it dries faster. It mUST be BONEDRY before you work with it next!

Ta Da!!!!!! It's dry! Take it in your studio now--cut it, make it into leaves or boxes or journal pages, stitch it, quilt it, bead it, bend it, burn it, add more layers of fabric, embroidery stitches, more paper-----make something from it!

Update on Wed, November 8, 2006 at 08:33AM by arleebarr
Thanks to all who commented! Someone asked if they could put this through a printer--i wouldn't--thickness is too much and if it heats up, it might gum the sheet AND the printer. Print your desired thingies beforehand and incorporate them. Vicky has a tutorial also, using dyes instead of paints, at http://seastrands.wordpress.com/2006/01/04/back-to-work/

Update on Thu, November 9, 2006 at 10:08AM by arleebarr
Oops, i also wanted to mention that you don"t HAVE to have a top layer of fabric----if you like the possible muting it gives, fine; otherwise you can just leave the layer of paper as the focus. Experiment. Try it with mesh/netting/tulle as well, gives a more transparent effect, but "cages" it if you want that look. I'd like to hear from some of you who are trying this--what did you come up with? Any tips? New applications? Share and play nice :}



Copyright © 2006 - All Rights Reserved — Written By Arlee Barr of Albedo Design. Arlee is a textile artist, fashion designer, seamstress, published poet, book critic, illustrator, artist and floral designer. According to Arlee: "Texture and shadow and illusion draw me: the more lush and luxurious, the more alluring and seductive. My passion manifests itself in one of a kind and limited edition garments. These pieces are wearable art fashioned using a variety of hand and machine techniques. My designs appeal to the adventurous, the non-conformist and the unique. Design shapes are simple, allowing the fabric and detailing to tell the story. Whether your taste is gothic, flamboyant, outrĂ©, avant-garde or just ready for something different, you can explore your closet dreams."

FREE Graphics by Carmen Gonzales


#285 Graphicaholic siggy

If you are addicted to graphics like I am then you are a Graphicaholic lol. Just admit it with this cute free siggy. Just click on the graphic to bring up a new window, then right click and save it to your computer.No need to add to cart



Tart*O*Holic

Cute lil annie sig for you to use at the forums or on your site.



Saltbox avatar

A freebie for you to use at the forums.



Annie FREE Avatar

A freebie for you to use at the forums.

Carmen's Terms of Use - If you are planning on using my graphics on any items you wish to sell, you will need to register with me and pay a one time commercial license fee. Then you can feel free to use any graphics you buy after that on your products. Please don't alter my graphics in any way, Thanks.


Copyright © 2006 Shweet Potato Designs - All Rights Reserved - Designs by Carmen Gonzales. Carm is a graphics artist and the owner/designer of Shweet Potato Designs.

How To Make Your Own Dried Orange Slices By Debbie Hainline

Drying Orange Slices

Drying your own orange slices is quite easy and is a wonderful addition to potpourri, wreaths and garland for the coming holiday season.You usually are able to cut 12 slices from an orange.

Choose fruit that is in good condition and not too ripe.

Cut each roange crosswise into 1/4 inch slices

Place slices between paper towels and remove as much moisture as possible.

Spray a cookie sheet with non stick vegetable spray ( oranges contain alot of sugar and have a tendency to get sticky making them stick to the pan) and place the orange slices in a single layer, do not let any of them touch.

Dry in a 150 degree oven for approxiamately 6 hours. Check every 1/2 hour. If the fruit appears to be turning brown the oven is too hot. Shut off for 15 minutes and start again. Turn fruit over if the edges appear to be curling.

When dry the fruit slices should be pliable.

This same method can be used for drying any type of citrus fruit. They may also be sprayed with shellac before using.

For more great crafting tips and techniques visit Two Old Crows (www.2oldcrows.com)


Copyright © 2006—All Rights Reserved — Written By Debbie Hainline on her "Two Old Crows" Blog. For more crafting tips and techniques visit Two Old Crows (http://2oldcrows.com). Two Old Crows is the web home of folk artist "Debbie Hainline" - "Teaching my knowledge about painting is as much a passion as creating".

FREE Graphic Outlines From Denise Bailey

Shown below are some of the FREE Graphic Outlines by Denise Bailey.






Denise Bailey's Terms of Use - Outlines
These outlines have been created by me. Credit must be given to me for the original image - ©Neenee.

You may:

use in graphics program to colorize, paint, make siggies
use as outline for stitching projects
use as outline for wood projects
sell your 'craft' creation using my outline, please give credit for original art work to me

You may not:

Alter my original design and call it your own
offer my original design for download
sell my original graphic / outline

If you have questions re: usage please email me at kklkreations@hotmail.com

Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved — Written By Denise Bailey (aka NeeNee) who is a 54 year old mom & grandma who has been crafting for over 34 years for myself and family but only in the last 2 years have been actively crafting for profit via craft shows, eBay and an EZshoppe. My 'specialties' are primitives, country and folkart creations.I also love to create graphics. I was interested in drawing since I was very young, taking art classes all through high school. I always thought I'd go to an art school after graduation, but instead I got married and started a family. Six years ago, I purchased my first computer, and found PSP. I've been hooked since and have taught myself to make my own graphics using PSP's vector & nodes tool. My website is: KKL Primitives .  My Blogs are: The Krazy Kraft Lady and Menopausal Monster .

How To Make Grubby Tags By Debbie Hainline

Making Your Own Grubby Tags

Grubby tags are a great addition to any primitive or country project. They can be used as tags on baskets, packages or even as Christmas ornaments too. You can make them as elaborate or as simple as you wish with decorating. The directions below are for the simple basic grubby background to the tag.

Supplies:

3x5 index cards ( You can substitute boughten shipping tags but I like using index cards - they are less expensive and you can make them any shape or size you want.)
3 heaping tablespoons of instant coffee ( the more expensive brands will give you a darker color - if you use a cheaper brand you may want to add more)
1 cup of boiling water
Few drops of vanilla ( I like vanilla for a scent, but do use cinnamon oil at Christmas time...the choice of scents is yours)

Directions:

Cut the index cards into the shape you want and punch a hole in the top ( I have used star shapes, Christmas trees, bells, snowflakes besides the standard tag shapes)Mix the hot water, instant coffee and vanilla well then apply with a sponge brush to both sides of the tag place on a drying rack to dry ( I use an old window screen but a baking rack will work also).

Let the tags dry thoroughly turning them over a couple of times . If they dry to light you can restain them. To hurry up this process place them on a cookie sheet in a low temperature oven for a few minutes.

If you would like the tags to have a motley effect spray them with a bit of water before completely dry.

Should the tags curl up ( I find this happens more often when I dry them in the oven) press them with a old iron on the cotton setting ( a pressing cloth may be used if you dont have an old iron).

You should also stain the string you use - embroidery thread may also be used as string as well as torn homespun or raffia.

Once they are completely dry the fun begins. Writing should be done with a permanent sharpie marker. Embellishments such as mica flakes, buttons, rubber stamping, bottle caps, vintage copies of photos, vintage images can all be used. Also like to paint on the tags with acrylics. If I do more than just write on them I do modge podge them. If the items you add seem to light colored just add some of the staining mixture to them with a q-tip.

Let your imagination and creativity run wild and have fun making tags !

For more great crafting tips and techniques visit us at Two Old Crows.

Copyright © 2006—All Rights Reserved — Written By Debbie Hainline on her "Two Old Crows" Blog. For more crafting tips and techniques visit Two Old Crows. Two Old Crows is the web home of folk artist "Debbie Hainline" - "Teaching my knowledge about painting is as much a passion as creating".

FREE Graphic Bows, Hats, and A Primitive Shelf From Denise Bailey

More FREE graphics from Denise Bailey (aka NeeNee).

Denise Bailey's Terms of Use for her Graphics - These images have been created by me. You are welcome to download them for your own personal use. You may make siggies with them for your members/friends. Please give credit to the images to ©Neenee. You may not redistribute them for download anywhere else nor claim as your own work.

These are graphics I made several years ago - the KK stands for Kuntry Kuzins, a nick I used at the time.

Kuntry Bow



Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved — KKL Graphics - Created By Denise Bailey

Kuntry Bow


Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved — KKL Graphics - Created By Denise Bailey


Kuntry Shelf

Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved — KKL Graphics - Created By Denise Bailey

Brown Sunhat


Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved — KKL Graphics - Created By Denise Bailey

Purple Sunhat


Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved — KKL Graphics - Created By Denise Bailey


Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved — Written By Denise Bailey (aka NeeNee) who is a 54 year old mom & grandma who has been crafting for over 34 years for myself and family but only in the last 2 years have been actively crafting for profit via craft shows, eBay and an EZshoppe. My 'specialties' are primitives, country and folkart creations.I also love to create graphics. I was interested in drawing since I was very young, taking art classes all through high school. I always thought I'd go to an art school after graduation, but instead I got married and started a family. Six years ago, I purchased my first computer, and found PSP. I've been hooked since and have taught myself to make my own graphics using PSP's vector & nodes tool. My website is: KKL Primitives .  My Blogs are: The Krazy Kraft Lady and Menopausal Monster .

How To Rust Items For That Primitive Look by Debbie Hainline

Rusting Items

This recipe will nicely rust safety pins, jingle bells, or anything else you want to 'age' for your primitive creations.The most important thing to remember about rusting, is that you will want to buy the cheap brand of pins, safety pins, bells..ect that you can find. The more expensive brands have a shellac coating on them that you will have to sand off before rusting. Makes sure they are NOT brass either -brass will not rust.Do this outside away from children and pets.....the fumes are terrible !

Ingredients:

1/2 cup cider vinegar
1/2 cup bleach
1 teaspoon salt

Directions :

Combine the ingredients in an old quart jar.

Add items you want to rust and cover loosely - place in a safe spot and let set for at least 2 days.

Line a tray with a couple of layers of paper towel and remove the items with an old fork from the mixture. place in the sunshine .......the items will begin to rust as they dry. Move them around so that they dry on all sides.

Perfectly rusted bells, pins, and any other item you wish to rust.

Caution: do not throw the mixture down the sink- dispose of properly where no animal or child could come in contact with.

For more great crafting tips visit us at Two Old Crows

Copyright © 2006—All Rights Reserved — Written By Debbie Hainline on her "Two Old Crows" Blog. For more crafting tips and techniques visit Two Old Crows. Two Old Crows is the web home of folk artist "Debbie Hainline" - "Teaching my knowledge about painting is as much a passion as creating".

FREE Primitive Graphics by Denise Bailey

New primitive graphics from Denise Bailey (aka NeeNee).

Denise Bailey's Terms of Use for her Graphics - These images have been created by me. You are welcome to download them for your own personal use. You may make siggies with them for your members/friends. Please give credit to the images to ©Neenee. You may not redistribute them for download anywhere else nor claim as your own work.


Bowl Of Fragrant Balls



Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved — KKL Graphics - Created By Denise Bailey

Cherish Heart Sign



Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved — KKL Graphics - Created By Denise Bailey

Heart Ginger Nodder



Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved — KKL Graphics - Created By Denise Bailey

Prim Blessings Plate



Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved — KKL Graphics - Created By Denise Bailey

Prim Sheep Pull Toy



Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved — KKL Graphics - Created By Denise Bailey



Copyright © 2007 - All Rights Reserved — Written By Denise Bailey (aka NeeNee) who is a 54 year old mom & grandma who has been crafting for over 34 years for myself and family but only in the last 2 years have been actively crafting for profit via craft shows, eBay and an EZshoppe. My 'specialties' are primitives, country and folkart creations.I also love to create graphics. I was interested in drawing since I was very young, taking art classes all through high school. I always thought I'd go to an art school after graduation, but instead I got married and started a family. Six years ago, I purchased my first computer, and found PSP. I've been hooked since and have taught myself to make my own graphics using PSP's vector & nodes tool. My website is: KKL Primitives .  My Blogs are: The Krazy Kraft Lady and Menopausal Monster .

How To Make Sweet Potato Garland by Debbie Hainline

Sweet Potato Garland

Sweet potato garland is a wonderful accent to primitive or country decor. Stringed sweet potato garland is perfect for hanging on a primitive tree or as garland on a fire place or doorway. I don’t suggest putting it outside unless you don’t mind the varmit and birds eating it.

Supplies:

Sweet potatoes ( you can use regular potatoes)
Instant coffee
Spices- nutmeg, ginger and cinnamon
Cotton string
Needle

First make your coffee staining mixture
3 heaping tablespoons of instant coffee (I have found that the more expensive coffee gives a deeper stain)
1 cup of boiling water
Mix the two and let steep for a few minutes

Stain your piece of cotton string with this mixture by dipping it in and letting it dry ( I would not do a garland more than 6 feet long) dry this completely.

Do not peel the potatoes but just cut into 1 inch cubes.

Mix equal amounts of your spices together in a pie pan.

Soak the cubes of potatoes in the coffee mixture then roll them in the spices covering thoroughly ( I like to roll them all once and then roll again).

Tightly string the cubes together because they will shrink while drying.

You can let these air dry or place in a 150 degree on a cookie sheet. Be sure to keep checking and scrunching them together as they dry to prevent gaps. ( Have found they are impossible to move on the string after drying).

These are a wonderful addition for fall decorating.

For more great crafting tips and techniques visit us at Two Old Crows


Copyright © 2006—All Rights Reserved — Written By Debbie Hainline on her "Two Old Crows" Blog. For more crafting tips and techniques visit Two Old Crows (http://2oldcrows.com). Two Old Crows is the web home of folk artist "Debbie Hainline" - "Teaching my knowledge about painting is as much a passion as creating".

How To Make Rag Garland by Debbie Hainline

Making Rag Garland

Making a rag garland is so simple and a great way to use up all of those fabric scraps you have lying around. They are great to use as swag and on trees. You can even do this on strings of lights instead of the the twine to make them even more festive.

Supplies:

Scraps of homespun and other types of fabric
Twine
Scissors

Directions:

Cut a piece of twine 5" longer than the length of the finished swag you want.

Make a fold at each end about 2 1/2 " long and tie it into a knot, leaving a loop for hanging.

Cut fabric strips 2" x 6". Each strip will take up about 1/4" of space on the garland so the length of the twine will determine how many strips you will need. For example for each 12 " of garland you will need 48 fabric strips. You can experiment with the strips to make it more or less full to your liking.

Tie each strip of fabric into a knot around the twine, centering the knot on the fabric strip. Repeat for each strip of fabric.

This takes some time but is great project to do in the evening watching tv. The possibilites are endless with the different fabrics you use.

For more great crafting tips and techniques visit Two Old Crows


Copyright © 2006—All Rights Reserved — Written By Debbie Hainline on her "Two Old Crows" Blog. For more crafting tips and techniques visit Two Old Crows (http://2oldcrows.com). Two Old Crows is the web home of folk artist "Debbie Hainline" - "Teaching my knowledge about painting is as much a passion as creating".

Easy Fabric-Covered Photo Album by Rachel Paxton

By: Rachel Paxton

These thoughtful, inexpensive keepsakes are easy to make and personalize for any friend or family member.

I decided to make mini cloth-covered photo albums for my mother and mother-in-law. These instructions apply to any size photo album--you just have to measure the album to get an idea how much fabric you're going to need.

Materials:

- 3-ring binder/photo album (doesn't have to be new--you are going to be covering it)
- Pages for photos (add when album is finished, or you might get glue on them)
- 1 large sheet white poster board
- 1 can spray adhesive (3M works well)
- Craft glue or glue gun
- Scissors and/or rotary fabric cutter
- Fabric—1 piece long enough to cover the outside of the album, and 2 pieces to cover each of inside covers. Allow extra inch to fold over edges of album.
- Silk flowers, appliques, beads, ribbons, lace (optional)

You will need three pieces of fabric. You want the piece on the outside of the album to be one piece that folds around the outside of the album. Leave 1 inch of material around the edges.

Use spray adhesive (available at most craft stores) to glue the fabric. Make sure to lay newspapers all around you and spray carefully or you'll end up with a big sticky mess. Also try not to let your fabric stick to the newspaper. Spray the glue directly on the outside of the album- -one side first, then the spine, then the other side. Smooth the fabric as you go, gently smoothing out any wrinkles quickly beforeit dries (you have a few minutes). You should now have the outside totally covered with fabric with 1 inch extra all around the edges of the album. Glue the extra inch of material on the sides down to the inside of the album. Now fold the top and bottom edges down and glue in place. The inside of the spine will still be visible after the inside covers are in place, so fold the extra inch at the spine in half first, then again and glue in place. The remaining exposed top and bottom edges will be covered with the inside covers.

The next step is to make the inside covers. Cut 2 pieces of poster board approximately 1/8-inch smaller (on all sides) than the inside covers of the photo album. Make sure to lay them in the photo album after you cut them to make sure they're the right size. You want to make sure the album can still open and close easily when they're in place. Cut 2 pieces of fabric to be 1/2-inch bigger (on allsides) than the pieces of poster board. Using spray adhesive, glue each piece of poster board to a square of fabric. Fold over the remaining ½ inch of fabric on the top, bottom, and sides, and glue to the back of the poster board. You should now have completed inside covers with no exposed fabric edges. Using spray adhesive, glue the inside covers into the inside front and inside back of the photo album,again making sure the album can open and close easily. You're done! Now you can add the pages for the photos. Here are some more options:

- If the album is big enough, you can cover a photo mat with fabric and glue it in the center of the front of the album. You can purchase the mat already cut, or you can make your own out of extra poster board, making it any size you want.

- If you want to have lace around the edges, glue the lace around the edges of the album after covering the front of the album with fabric, and before gluing in the inside covers. The inside covers will hide the bottom edge of the trimming. Glue in place with craft glue or a glue gun.

- Embellish the cover with appliques, beads, and silk flowers. Glue in place with craft glue or a glue gun.

After you practice on one of these albums, you'll see how easy it is and you'll be able to see all the millions of possibilities. These albums can as fancy or simple as you want, and can cost a lot or next to nothing. I made one for my sister as awedding present that cost about $50 after I bought the nice fabric, appliques, lace, etc.

For Mother's Day, however, I found some mini photo albums on sale 2 for $3. They hold up to 4 x 6 photos. I'm going to find a photo to cut down a bit to fit on the front cover, one for my family, and one for my husband's. If I get in a bind for time I will try to find some fabric on sale (should only require approximately ½ yard each for the small albums). If I have time I'll do a little yard sale shopping and try to pick up some fabric that way. If you sew or do many crafts, you may already have some fabric on hand. It's also a good idea to stock up on different sized albums when they're on sale. Keep on the lookout for extra trimmings on sale and at yard sales. Don't forget the unconventional, like sequins and buttons. These thoughtful albums make great gifts for all occasions.

Article by:

Originally published at Suite 101. Rachel Paxton is a freelance writer and mom of four. For scrapbooking, card making, gift-giving ideas, and more family memory-making activities, visit http://www.crafty-moms.com/.

Article Source: www.ladypens.com

How To Make Papier Mache by Debbie Hainline

Dryer Lint Paper Mache

This inexpensive recipe is easy to make and works in those plastic candy molds very well. Just allow enough time for drying.

Supplies:
1 cup of lint from the dryer
1 cup torn up tissue paper (want colored use colored tissue paper)
2 tsp. liquid starch
2 cups waterCheeseclothMold

Directions:

Mix lint, tissue paper, liquid starch and water altogether and blend until smooth in the blender.

Pour into cheesecloth draped over a bowl and press out as much of the liquid as possible.

Add to mold and press tightly.

Let air dry.

Remove from mold carefully and sand lightly.

Now you can paint these up anyway you like ......they make wonderful Christmas ornaments sprinkled with mica flakes or glass glitter.

For more great crafting tips and techniques visit us at Two Old Crows


Copyright © 2006—All Rights Reserved — Written By Debbie Hainline on her "Two Old Crows" Blog. For more crafting tips and techniques visit Two Old Crows (http://2oldcrows.com). Two Old Crows is the web home of folk artist "Debbie Hainline" - "Teaching my knowledge about painting is as much a passion as creating".

Distressing Wood and Metal From Debbie Hainline

Distressing is one of the most effective and easiest ways to age furniture or a painted piece. We can take a new piece and make it look like it has been around for years and been touched by hands many times with a very simple technique using candle wax. I prefer using beeswax candles for this but any white candle may be used.

First look at the piece and decide if you wish the finished piece to look like a piece that has been painted many times over, if so you will need to paint two colors. If you wish the finish piece to be bare wood where rubbed off you will only need to do a topcoat.Sand the entire piece with a fine grade sandpaper and wipe with a tack cloth.

If you wish a color beneath the paint rubbed off apply it now and allow to dry for 2-4 hours.

Using the candle on its side rub over the entire piece, paying special attention to the edges and corners, anywhere the piece may have been touched alot ( around handles) areas where it would have naturally gotten distressed.

Now paint the entire piece going over the wax with a topcoat, be sure to paint with the grain of the wood. Let dry thoroughly.

Using steel wool rub the paint in the direction of the grain of the wood. Where there is wax underneath the paint will come off revealing either the bare wood or the color beneath. Avoid rubbing the steel wool against the grain as this will create an ugly scratch effect rather than a smooth distressed look.

If you wish you can repeat this process to make the piece look like it has been painted several times in different colors.

When completely finished wipe the entire piece with a tack cloth and protect the piece by varnishing.

Distressing can be done on both metal and wood.....just remember to follow the steps given before to prepare the surfaces for painting.

For more great crafting tips and techniques visit us at Two Old Crows.


Copyright © 2006—All Rights Reserved — Written By Debbie Hainline on her "Two Old Crows" Blog. For more crafting tips and techniques visit Two Old Crows. Two Old Crows is the web home of folk artist "Debbie Hainline" - "Teaching my knowledge about painting is as much a passion as creating".

How To Make A Grungy Candle By Debbie Hainline

Grungy candles are very easy to make and just take a little time and patience.

Supplies:

Pillar or regular stick candles - I look for these on sale or at backyard sales.
Wax
Spices such as cinnamon, crushed cloves,ginger,allspice, grated lemon peel, grated orange peel (use any mix of these spices you like)
Fragrance oil such as cinnamon ( you can scent these or not)
Paint brush
Wax paper

Directions:

Carefully melt your wax adding the fragrance if you like.

Place wax paper on your table and add any mix of the above spices.

Paint one strip on the candle and then while the wax is still hot, roll that part into the spices. Continue until completed.

Let your candle dry for at least 48 hours before using.

Try very hard not to get the hot wax and spices on your candle wick. But, you can apply extra wax on the candle to look like candle wax is melting down the candle.

A word of warning: Do not light these candles they are for decorative purposes only. If you are going to sell these or give them away be sure to include a warning with them.

For more great crafting tips and techniques visit us at Two Old Crows


Copyright © 2006—All Rights Reserved — Written By Debbie Hainline on her "Two Old Crows" Blog. For more crafting tips and techniques visit Two Old Crows (http://2oldcrows.com). Two Old Crows is the web home of folk artist "Debbie Hainline" - "Teaching my knowledge about painting is as much a passion as creating".